The Tang Soo Do, aka tangsudo, is the Korean traditional martial art, dating back hundreds of years where development was influenced by techniques and philosophies of China, Okinawa and Korea. The basic techniques and form of tangsudo have origins of Karate, and represent fighting against several opponents.

History of TangSooDo

After the invasion of Korea (1910-1945), the Japanese banned several martial arts schools for 35 years. Grandmaster Hwang Kee invented and began teaching tangsodo behind closed doors. When the Korean nation was released from Japanese rule, the President of South Korea, Singman Rhee, gave approval to Master Won Kuk Lee to begin a “new” national martial art, and he founded Chungdokwan school of Tang Soo Do.

Training

Every student must understand the dynamics of Hapiko and refine them in order to correct posture, balance and have fluid movements. The foundation of tangsudo starts with learning strategy, tactics, timing and balance, and mastering the different levels of complexity. As students increase their experience and capabilities, they move on to four advanced techniques;
Fighting Techniques of Tangsudo

Tang Su Do places great emphasis on hand techniques and foot flexibility that are used to block and attack. The basic moves are a self-defense approach using locks, punches, kicks and releases (or melee), which are known as Hapkido.

Hapkido teaches discipline and energy development — binding your energy to give more power. Over the decades, Hapkido splintered into various teachings that combine cultural and modern techniques, but every form of martial art training includes Hapkido.

There are many positions in the tangsudo, whether traditional, for attack, defense or combat, but the foundation is built on “the posture of preparedness.”

Every student must understand the dynamics of Hapiko and refine their techniques in order to correct posture, balance and have fluid movements. The foundation of tangsudo begins by learning strategy, tactics, timing and balance, and then mastering the different levels of complexity. As students increase their experience they move on to four advanced techniques;
Free Combat. In free combat or sparring, students can practice learned techniques against other practitioners, but in a controlled manner.

Combat. This exercise allows students to practice techniques of defense against an expected attack. The objective is to develop automatic responses to certain situations. This helps students learn proper distance and timing, that are crucial factors in a real confrontation.

Self Defense. This activity teaches students how to defend against grabs, and punches, and to deal with situations where it is necessary to defend themselves without causing injury to the opponent.

Rupture. Breaking of boards, tables, or other objects demonstrates the effectiveness of learned techniques, and helps to understand the effect students can have on a target. This activity teaches students how to concentrate and properly execute techniques.
Experts continue to debate the origins of many martial art forms, but it’s agreed that Tang Soo Do is a combination of Kung Fu, Karate, and Shotokan, formed in “new korea”. Today, Tang Su Do is typically used for sports competitions and exhibitions.

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